The Blueprint of Destiny

I wonder if God embeds a blueprint of our destiny into our hearts. Whether we dare to follow this mysterious plan is our choice. How do we know what the blueprint holds? The answer lies in what we feel passionate about doing.

My son, Josiah, overlooking Cape Town, South Africa, from Lion's Head

This morning, I awoke from an interesting dream in which I embarked upon a quest with my future grandson. This brown-skin child had incredible endurance as we leapt off a high cliff into frigid waters below.

Cliff jumping, Colorado River

A citizen of the world, my grandson embraced every new adventure with wide eyes and fearless resolve.

At one point in the dream, I asked two grandparents from India to watch him while I found dry clothes for him to wear. When I returned, the grandparents had their granddaughter standing next to my grandson.

Both children smiled at me as the girl’s grandparents teased, “An arranged marriage.” The two children looked perfectly suited for each other.

I awoke and chuckled over my vivid imagination. Surely India is on my mind because my son and his girlfriend just arrived there a few days ago. I rationalized. After all, I had just read Monique’s Facebook comment the night before…

 

How can one not be overwhelmed with the sights, sounds, and smells of India, I had mused before bed. To be honest, India equally intrigues and terrifies me.

My heart warmed as I wrote my dream down and thought about my children and the partners they’ve chosen.

Josiah and Monique in Kruger National Park, South African

I know with certainty that my offspring possess the same genetic code that propelled me to travel to twenty-five countries and live overseas for almost eight years.

Elya and Matt

My children have dared to follow their hearts and venture into the world. They sense this mysterious embedded blueprint that drives them to leave the comforts of home and country in search of their destinies.

Josiah in an ultralight over Victoria Falls, South Africa

I smiled and choked back emotion as I contemplated their future and where they might end up living.

Halong Bay, Vietnam

This morning my mother’s heart fills with admiration and appreciation for their courage and inner resolve. I don’t know what Josiah and Monique’s trip to India means for their future, but I suspect it holds a particular significance they are yet to discover.

So I’d better keep my passport updated and my traveling shoes ready. For God has imbedded His blueprint into my heart, and I suspect the time is coming when He will offer me the choice of whether or not I follow.

11 responses to “The Blueprint of Destiny

  1. Oh JoDee I would struggle if my children were led to go far from home as your’s have. I would definitely keep my passport close at hand and my options open to travel wherever I felt led.

    I loved your dream and the arranged marriage. How cute!

    All my life I have felt the call to travel but to where I do not know but I love to come home almost as much as leaving.

    • flyinggma, thank you for the condolences. I must admit that as I age, I find travel more challenging. I visited my son in Buenos Aires the summer before last when he was working there for three months. My luggage was lost for days and I had to wear my daughter’s clothes. Believe me, that was a challenge because she is so slender. It was winter and very cold. I’ll tell you what, if I end up traveling to see them, I’ll let you know. Maybe you could make a trip 🙂

  2. That is an interesting dream indeed. I wonder if, at some point in the future, something will trigger you to remember the dream and you’ll finally realize its significance?

    Your children do seem adventurous, so it looks like you will have travel in your future!

    • Tony, I felt the same way when I read your Twitter profile. I think we have similar minds. I’m looking forward to visiting your blog. Thanks for stopping by and leaving such an encouraging comment. I have four other blogs that all feature a part of my identity. You can find them in my blog links.

  3. A beautiful post on a gorgeous blog. I can’t help but feel the fine balance of visual and narrative shown here must reflect the symmetry of your nature and heart. This post in particular speaks to me as my four children travel far and wide too. As a mother I admire their independence and fearless embrace of life and other cultures. As a mother, I miss them at my side.

    • Leigh,

      Thank you for such an amazing comment. You do understand, “As a mother I admire their independence and fearless embrace of life and other cultures. As a mother, I miss them at my side.” Your insight says it all. My heart feels torn. I would love to read of your children’s travels. Do you have posts referring to this?

      Thank you as well for the complement about my blog. Your words expressed my intent.

  4. Pingback: What’s a pusillanimous aunt to do? — Refrain from the Identical·

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